Skin-Whitening Uptake Sparks Concern Among Australian Dermatologists

The popularity of skin-whitening is on the rise with the market for skin lighteners projected to reach $US23 billion ($30.5 billion) by 2020, according to market intelligence firm Global Industry Analysts. Across Asia, it is normal to walk into a beauty store and see mostly skin-whitening products adorning the shelves. Whitening is a cultural trend and derives from what's known as "colourism" — a system that privileges lighter skin. It can be pervasive in Asian cultures where darker skin is often associated with manual outdoor work like farming, and therefore a lower status. Dermatologists in Australia said they were concerned about the risks of using the products where some ingredients were not clearly disclosed or were in foreign languages. The Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) said the chemical hydroquinone was the most commonly used ingredient in skin-whitening products.    Source: Thuy Ong, ABC News Skin-whitening

Johnson & Johnson to Pay $148 Million in Damages to Woman Who ‘Got Cancer’ from their Baby Powder

Cosmetics company Johnson & Johnson has been ordered to pay US$110 million (AU$148 million) to a woman who says she developed ovarian cancer after 40 years of using of its talc- based products for feminine hygiene. Lois Slemp, who lives in the US state of Virginia, is undergoing chemotherapy after her ovarian cancer, initially diagnosed in 2012, returned and spread to her liver. Ms Slemp said she developed cancer after four decades of daily use of talc-containing products produced by J & J, specifically the well-known Johnson’s Baby Powder and Shower to Shower Powder.    Source: News.com Talc cancer

TGA Issues Guidance on Advertising Cosmetic Services that Include Schedule 4 Substances

This advice is for health professionals and cosmetic/beauty clinics who advertise cosmetic services that involve therapeutic goods containing Schedule 4 (prescription-only) substances. These groups are reminded that advertising of prescription-only products to consumers is illegal. This offence attracts a maximum penalty of $10,800 for an individual and $54,000 for a body corporate. The Act broadly defines an advertisement in relation to therapeutic goods as including any statement, pictorial representation or design, however made, that is intended, whether directly or indirectly, to promote the use or supply of the goods.    Source: TGA cosmetic advertising

RFA Breaking News

Complementary medicines ("Dietary supplements"):

Reforms to the Regulatory Framework for Complementary Medicines In February 2017 the TGA announced a public consultation, ‘Consultation: Reforms to the regulatory framework for complementary medicines: Assessment pathways’. A total…

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Foods:

NSW Food Authority Name and Shame Serves Up Nine Years of Food Safety The NSW Food Authority’s 'Name and Shame' register reaches another important milestone this month, chalking up nine years of…

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Cosmetics & Household Chemicals

Dishwasher Tablets: Campaign to Eradicate Products that aren't Squeaky Clean In a move to protect Australia's waterways and wildlife from algal blooms, the environment pressure group DoSomething today launches a…

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Marketing News:

Probiotics in China — ‘The market is set to explode’ The probiotics sector is forecast to soar by 23% in China to 2020 and even greater long-term growth beckons if…

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Complementary medicines:

TGA Results Confirm Effectiveness After Sunscreen Testing In response to reported concerns during the past Australian summer that sunscreens were failing to provide adequate sun protection, the TGA undertook laboratory…

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Foods:

CHOICE Makes Weighty Argument to Leave Food Labelling Alone Consumer group CHOICE has turned its attention to the weight of your favourite supermarket items as the government initiates a review.…

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